Current

Orchestra of Letters

The Lettering Arts Centre, Snape Maltings
2 June–2 October 2017

Edmund De Waal Shadow Stones

As part of the Aldeburgh Festival, Edmund de Waal's piece Shadow Stones is included in the exhibition Orchestra of Letters at the Lettering Arts Centre. About the piece, inspired by the work of Paul Celan, De Waal writes: 

"I’ve made pots since childhood, porcelain for almost thirty years. Gradually these have evolved into groupings of vessels that I hold together in vitrines or on shelves. Much of this work is concerned with memories of places or people or with remembered pieces of music or poetry. The poems of Paul Celan haunt me. I’ve made several substantial exhibitions that centre on his fragmentary lyrics. Here the black vessel sits alongside pieces of Cor-Ten steel and an aluminium box containing broken black shards. This piece is called shadows stones after these lines:In the rivers north of the futureI cast the net, which youhesitantly weightwith shadows stoneswrote. I love the idea that objects can aspire to music or words, just as much as words as lettering have heft and presence." 

As part of the Aldeburgh Festival, Edmund de Waal's piece Shadow Stones is included in the exhibition Orchestra of Letters at the Lettering Arts Centre. About the piece, inspired by the work of Paul Celan, De Waal writes: 

"I’ve made pots since childhood, porcelain for almost thirty years. Gradually these have evolved into groupings of vessels that I hold together in vitrines or on shelves. Much of this work is concerned with memories of places or people or with remembered pieces of music or poetry. The poems of Paul Celan haunt me. I’ve made several substantial exhibitions that centre on his fragmentary lyrics. Here the black vessel sits alongside pieces of Cor-Ten steel and an aluminium box containing broken black shards. This piece is called shadows stones after these lines:

In the rivers north of the future
I cast the net, which you
hesitantly weight
with shadows stones
wrote. 


I love the idea that objects can aspire to music or words, just as much as words as lettering have heft and presence." 

Read more