Exhibitions
Current exhibition

sukkah

Canterbury Cathedral

Passover and Holy Week 2021

EDW Canterbury press 3

sukkah (2019), originally created for a synagogue in the Venetian Ghetto as part of de Waal's installation psalm, is currently on loan to Canterbury Cathedral.

sukkah (2019), originally created for a synagogue in the Venetian Ghetto as part of de Waal's installation psalm, is currently on loan to Canterbury Cathedral.


The work has been installed in St Gabriel’s Chapel, in the Crypt of the Cathedral, a place famed for its striking early twelfth-century frescoes and Romanesque carvings of animals playing musical instruments.

“It is a great privilege to bring this work to a place that I have known and loved since childhood. Sukkah will have moved from the highest space of the Venetian Jewish Ghetto to deep within the oldest parts of Canterbury Cathedral. Both these spaces contain imagery of celebration and it feels appropriate to be announcing this on the eve of the two great festivals of Passover and Easter. I hope its resonance of vulnerability and protection, contemplation and prayer will be manifest here.”
- Edmund de Waal

The work, sukkah, was originally conceived for the Sukkah in the Canton Scuola synagogue in the Jewish Ghetto in Venice for the 2019 Venice Biennale. Sukkot, the Feast of the Tabernacles, is the festival that commemorates the forty years of wandering in the desert. The work is comprised of nine towers which appear to float above the table, each containing tall white porcelain vessels and leaning pieces of gilded steel that catch the light from the medieval stained-glass windows.

“We feel privileged and deeply moved to have Edmund’s work sukkah standing in St Gabriel’s Chapel in the crypt of Canterbury Cathedral at this significant time of year for both Jewish and Christian communities. It is a work which reminds us of the fragility not only of human life, but also of the shelters we construct during our human journeys. The light which shines through the ancient stained glass changes hour by hour and day by day, and the sense of ‘reflection’ becomes not only real as one observes its effect on the installation, but also an aspect of our mental and spiritual ability to reflect on our human condition and its capacity to journey beyond the seeming limitations we experience. It also becomes an invitation to journey on together in faith and hope for the future. Sukkah will enrich the Cathedral’s life in Holy Week and Easter by its presence among us.”
- The Very Revd Dr Robert Willis, Dean of Canterbury

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Forthcoming exhibition

This Living Hand

Henry Moore Studios & Gardens, Perry Green
May 2021 (planned opening)

41 Lh 707 Hands

A new exhibition of Henry Moore's work, curated by de Waal for the Henry Moore Foundation, will now open in stage 3 of the government's roadmap for England. The earliest date for this is currently 17 May 2021. This Living Hand will explore the role of touch and the iconography of the hand in Henry Moore’s art.

A new exhibition of Henry Moore's work, curated by de Waal for the Henry Moore Foundation, will now open in stage 3 of the government's roadmap for England. The earliest date for this is currently 17 May 2021. This Living Hand will explore the role of touch and the iconography of the hand in Henry Moore’s art.

In the exhibition, de Waal will present a selection of original sculptures and other objects by Moore which visitors will be invited to touch, as well as a group of drawings and sculptural works charting Moore’s interest in the hand as a subject, from Reclining Figure: Hand (1979) to the numerous two and three-dimensional studies of his own and other subjects’ hands, including the drawings and lithographs he made in 1978 of the winner of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Dorothy Hodgkin, who wanted her hands to be used as her portrait.

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Current exhibition

tacet

New Art Centre, Wiltshire

Tacet benches 1

Following on from the exhibition, tacet, last year, de Waal's series of Hornton stone benches of the same name are now installed in the grounds of the New Art Centre, Wiltshire.

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Current exhibition

stone for two hands and water

Henry Moore Foundation Gardens

From 31 March 2021

Edmund de Waal stone for two hands and water 3

As part of the forthcoming exhibition at the Henry Moore Foundation, Edmund de Waal has made a ’tsukubai’ - a hand-washing basin traditional to Japanese Zen gardens.

As part of the forthcoming exhibition at the Henry Moore Foundation, Edmund de Waal has made a ’tsukubai’ - a hand-washing basin traditional to Japanese Zen gardens.


In de Waal's words "I have made a place to pause, just outside the gallery, with water running over stone where you can wash your hands. It is a sculpture recollecting the stone basins in Japanese gardens. I’ve called it stone for two hands and water."

The exhibition is scheduled to open on 17 May 2021, in line with government guidelines, and the gardens are open to the public from 31 March.

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Past News
Exhibition

some winter pots

Gagosian, London
3 December 2020 – 16 January 2021

EDW Gagosian unedited 2

This exhibition at Gagosian's Davies Street gallery brings together a group vessels made by Edmund de Waal during lockdown. This is the first time in sixteen years that de Waal has made single works that are not parts of installations. They are specifically designed to be touched and held in the hand.

This exhibition at Gagosian's Davies Street gallery brings together a group vessels made by Edmund de Waal during lockdown. This is the first time in sixteen years that de Waal has made single works that are not parts of installations. They are specifically designed to be touched and held in the hand.


De Waal comments, “I made these pots in lockdown during the spring and early summer. I was alone in my studio and silent and I needed to make vessels to touch and hold, to pass on. I needed to return to what I know—the bowl, the open dish, the lidded jar. When you pick them up you will find the places where I have marked and moved the soft clay. Some of these pots are broken and patched on their rims with folded lead and gold; others are mended with gold lacquer. Some hold shards of porcelain.

In the studio I had two old Chinese bowls from the Song dynasty. One was patched on the rim with iron. The other had a beautiful thin golden thread running from the rim, repaired using the Japanese art of kintsugi. Kintsugi is not an art of erasure—the invisible mend, the erasing of a mistake—but rather a way of marking loss. Both these bowls were central to the making of this work.

These black vessels show the flux of glaze. The white dishes have been fired without glaze so that each mark is present. They are bone clear. These are some pots for the hands, for this winter.”

The exhibition was installed so that it could also be seen from the street.

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Project

library of exile catalogue

Online catalogue

Edmund De Waal Psalm Venice 02

The library of exile is now open at the British Museum, London. The library has its own online catalogue which is continually updated with new titles. Explore and search the holdings by language, author, category or country on its dedicated website here.

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