Exhibitions
Forthcoming exhibition

Lettres à Camondo

Musée Nissim de Camondo, Paris
7 October 2021 – 15 May 2022

EDW Paris work 19 detail 2 for web

Following the publication of Lettres à Camondo, the Musée Nissim de Camondo will stage an exhibition of new installations by de Waal made especially for its rooms and collections. The museum has remained unaltered since 1936 and this is the first invitation of its kind to a living artist.

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Current exhibition

This Living Hand

Henry Moore Studios & Gardens, Perry Green
19 May – 31 October 2021

41 Lh 707 Hands

After a year in lockdown, a new exhibition of Henry Moore's work, curated by de Waal for the Henry Moore Studios & Gardens, is now open to the public. Located at the artist's former home in Hertfordshire, This Living Hand explores the role of touch and the iconography of the hand in Moore’s art.

After a year in lockdown, a new exhibition of Henry Moore's work, curated by de Waal for the Henry Moore Studios & Gardens, is now open to the public. Located at the artist's former home in Hertfordshire, This Living Hand explores the role of touch and the iconography of the hand in Moore’s art.

The first exhibition of its kind, visitors are invited to touch a collection of Moore's work in bronze and stone, as well as a number of original carved benches, created by de Waal, from Hornton stone – one of Moore's favourite materials. Alongside these sculptural works, a room of drawings and prints chart Moore’s interest in the hand as a subject, from The Three Fates (1948) to the numerous studies of his own and other subjects’ hands, including those he made in 1978 of the Nobel Prize winner, Dorothy Hodgkin, who wanted her hands to be used as her portrait. Upstairs, de Waal has curated a wunderkammer of objects that Moore kept close by him at home, 'objects of sustenance and renewal'.

Moore believed that ‘tactile experience is very important as an aesthetic dimension in sculpture’. Throughout his career he repeatedly emphasised the importance of experiencing sculpture haptically, and often returned to the hand as a subject in his sculpture and drawings, studying its expressive power and symbolic values as Auguste Rodin and Michelangelo, two of his favourite artists, had done before him.

For de Waal, in This Living Hand, "we see a life of reflection on how hands become sculpture. We are returned to what knowledge our own hands hold.”

Image: Moore holding the plaster maquette for Reclining Figure: Hand 1976, (LH 707). Photo: Henry Moore Archive. Reproduced by permission of The Henry Moore Foundation

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Current exhibition

Masterpieces in Miniature

Pallant House Gallery, Chichester

26 June 2021 – Spring 2022

Pallant House Masterpieces in Miniature High Res 7

Bringing together miniature artworks from over 80 artists, this exhibition at Pallant House includes works by Augustus John, Vanessa Bell, Paul Nash, Sir Peter Blake and Richard Hamilton as well as new pieces by Rachel Whiteread, Damien Hirst, John Akomfrah, Tacita Dean and Lubaina Himid.

Bringing together miniature artworks from over 80 artists, this exhibition at Pallant House includes works by Augustus John, Vanessa Bell, Paul Nash, Sir Peter Blake and Richard Hamilton as well as new pieces by Rachel Whiteread, Damien Hirst, John Akomfrah, Tacita Dean and Lubaina Himid.


De Waal has contributed a miniature pot entitled and show and end, the title of which is taken from Emily Dickinson's poem about tiny and huge things.

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Current exhibition

sukkah

Canterbury Cathedral

Passover and Holy Week 2021

EDW Canterbury press 3

sukkah (2019), originally created for a synagogue in the Venetian Ghetto as part of de Waal's installation psalm, is currently on loan to Canterbury Cathedral.

sukkah (2019), originally created for a synagogue in the Venetian Ghetto as part of de Waal's installation psalm, is currently on loan to Canterbury Cathedral.


The work has been installed in St Gabriel’s Chapel, in the Crypt of the Cathedral, a place famed for its striking early twelfth-century frescoes and Romanesque carvings of animals playing musical instruments.

“It is a great privilege to bring this work to a place that I have known and loved since childhood. Sukkah will have moved from the highest space of the Venetian Jewish Ghetto to deep within the oldest parts of Canterbury Cathedral. Both these spaces contain imagery of celebration and it feels appropriate to be announcing this on the eve of the two great festivals of Passover and Easter. I hope its resonance of vulnerability and protection, contemplation and prayer will be manifest here.”
- Edmund de Waal

The work, sukkah, was originally conceived for the Sukkah in the Canton Scuola synagogue in the Jewish Ghetto in Venice for the 2019 Venice Biennale. Sukkot, the Feast of the Tabernacles, is the festival that commemorates the forty years of wandering in the desert. The work is comprised of nine towers which appear to float above the table, each containing tall white porcelain vessels and leaning pieces of gilded steel that catch the light from the medieval stained-glass windows.

“We feel privileged and deeply moved to have Edmund’s work sukkah standing in St Gabriel’s Chapel in the crypt of Canterbury Cathedral at this significant time of year for both Jewish and Christian communities. It is a work which reminds us of the fragility not only of human life, but also of the shelters we construct during our human journeys. The light which shines through the ancient stained glass changes hour by hour and day by day, and the sense of ‘reflection’ becomes not only real as one observes its effect on the installation, but also an aspect of our mental and spiritual ability to reflect on our human condition and its capacity to journey beyond the seeming limitations we experience. It also becomes an invitation to journey on together in faith and hope for the future. Sukkah will enrich the Cathedral’s life in Holy Week and Easter by its presence among us.”
- The Very Revd Dr Robert Willis, Dean of Canterbury

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Current exhibition

tacet

New Art Centre, Wiltshire

Tacet benches 1

Following on from the exhibition, tacet, last year, de Waal's series of Hornton stone benches of the same name are now installed in the grounds of the New Art Centre, Wiltshire.

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Current exhibition

stone for two hands and water

Henry Moore Foundation Gardens

From 31 March 2021

Edmund de Waal a stone for two hands and water

As part of This Living Hand, the current exhibition at the Henry Moore Foundation, Edmund de Waal has made a ’tsukubai’ - a hand-washing basin traditional to Japanese Zen gardens.

As part of This Living Hand, the current exhibition at the Henry Moore Foundation, Edmund de Waal has made a ’tsukubai’ - a hand-washing basin traditional to Japanese Zen gardens.

In de Waal's words "I have made a place to pause, just outside the gallery, with water running over stone where you can wash your hands. It is a sculpture recollecting the stone basins in Japanese gardens. I’ve called it stone for two hands and water."

The exhibition opened on Weds 19 May 2021, in line with government guidelines. The gardens reopened to the public on 31 March.

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